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Scotland and the Scottish


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Glencoe, Scotland

Glencoe, Scotland


Edinburgh Castle, Scotland

Edinburgh Castle, Scotland


This is the Home Page of the Scottish section of the British Towns and Villages Website. The main function of this page is to allow you to select a region of Scotland to access more detailed information about the Unitary Authorities within each of the Scottish Regions. This can be achieved by either clicking on an area of map of Scotland above or by making a selection from the list of Scottish Regions at the top of the right hand column menu.

There are short cuts at the top of the left hand column menu to more specific Scottish information such as Road Traffic Information, Scottish Tourist Attritions, Events in Scotland and other major websites about Scotland. From the lower left hand column menu you can view Scotland through its old, historic country structure or work your way through an alphabetical list of the modern Scottish Unitary Authorities each of which links to the communities within them or if you know where you wish to go you can use the lists of Scottish Cities or the Scottish Towns and Communities and go directly to the local level information.

There are articles about the Scottish Crown Jewels and the Scottish Monarchs who once used the which you may access from the lower right hand column menu and links to a physical map of Scotland and a map and article about the Highland Geology which explains in simple terms why Scotland is such an interesting and beautiful place to live or perhaps visit.

The land of Scotland

The northern third of the island of Britain, which for a thousand years has been known as Scotland, is divided geographically into three parts, The Northern Highlands, the Central Lowlands and the Southern Uplands.

The Northern Highlands average about 1,500 feet above sea level and are mostly heather covered rocks where nothing can be grown. In the little valleys between the hills and mountains a few sheep are pastured. Much of the country is used today for hunting preserves, and is a region where the Red Deer can still be stalked and grouse shot. Forestry and tourism are also important sources of revenue in the Highland Region.

The Central Lowlands of Scotland form fairly good farming country, where wheat, oats, barley, etc., are grown, and where a considerable dairying business is carried on. The Scottish people are good farmers and know how to make economical use of the land. In few parts of Europe has farming improved so rapidly in the last century as in the Lowlands of Scotland.

The Southern Uplands are less fertile, and, though various crops can be grown, sheep raising is the chief agricultural occupation in the part of Scotland.

The coastline of Scotland is very irregular, the western part having a fringe of 'firths' (fiords) and peninsulas and islands. The Orkney and Shetland Islands, the Northern Isles, to the north, and the Outer Hebrides or Western Isles are parts of Scotland.

The greater portion of the mainland is mountainous. The rugged Grampian Mountains (average height 2,000 to 3,000 feet) separate the Highlands from the Lowlands and have at their western extremity Ben Nevis ('ben' means 'mountain'), Scotland's and Britain's highest peak (4,406 feet). Southward are lesser peaks and groups, of which Ben Lomond (3,192 feet), although not the highest , is the most famous. The Cheviot Hills (highest peak 2,658 feet) lie on the southern border.

Scotland is dotted with numerous lakes, of which beautiful Loch Lomond is the largest and most famous in story. Loch Ness and Loch Lochy, with their connecting waters, were joined in 1803 by canals with locks so as to make a continuous waterway (the Caledonian Canal) 62 miles long across northern Scotland, from the Moray Firth, an arm of the North Sea, to the Firth of Lorne, which opens to the Atlantic Ocean. Vessels of 500 to 600 tons, usually fishing boats and Royal Navy tenders and support vessels, pass through the canal, and it is a favourite route for tourists on pleasure craft in the summer season.

Visitors and Tourists to Scotland

If you are taking your holiday or vacation in Scotland you will find details of accommodation, attractions and events throughout this website. As you move around the site you will discover that we display smaller attractions and events as you zoom in to local level. Hence you will find "Highland Games" at county level and "Scottish Ceilidhes" and local fairs at district level. Organisers of events and owners of attractions is Scotland of any size are free to apply for a listing and they do not need their own website to do it because they will have their own page on our site with as much detail as they wish including a location map and pictures if they are available.

News Headlines from around Scotland

BBC News - Scotland Sat, 28 Nov 2015 17:21:43 GMT

The latest stories from the Scotland section of the BBC News web site.

Source Logo News Items
Thousands join climate change march

Thousands of people march in Edinburgh to demand that the Scottish and UK governments act to prevent climate change.

Boy 'critical' after being hit by car

A nine-year-old boy is in a critical condition after being hit by a car outside a school in the Highlands.

GB lead after Murrays win doubles

Britain are one win from a first Davis Cup title in 79 years after Andy and Jamie Murray's doubles victory against Belgium.

Anti-racism march welcomes refugees

An anti-racism march in Glasgow sends out a message that refugees are welcome in Scotland.

Ajax fans in 'assaults and bar attacks'

Ajax fans are thought to be responsible for a major disturbance in Glasgow on Thursday before their team's Europa League game against Celtic.

Anti-terror plans 'updated' after Paris

Anti-terrorism police in Scotland have reviewed and updated their training and planning in the wake of the Paris attacks, officers reveal.

Man jailed after shotgun incident

A man who shot through the bedroom window of his ex-girlfriend's Edinburgh home after she split up with him is jailed for seven-and-a-half years.

Black Friday shoppers 'move online'

There was little sign of a Black Friday shopping frenzy on the high streets as Scots appeared to turn to the internet for bargains.

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